Just because you build it doesn’t mean they will come!


Before we start, and to prevent you wasting time if you don’t like what I am about to say, I am not a techie. Not in any way shape or form. I barely manage to operate my Mac let alone advise on the finer points of the dark magic worked by you technocrats out there. However, I have always followed my good friend Shashank’s blog with interest and love to read different views on events out there.

So when he asked me to pen a follow up to his informative and interesting article Seven ways for start-ups to monetize business about how start-ups might scale their businesses once they have established their revenue model, well how could I refuse. So here are my 5 key thoughts, and perhaps (hopefully) they are not what you might expect:

1. Oh, let’s go back to the start

Shashank’s piece identified many, if not perhaps all, of the revenue models available to tech start-ups in a very easy to read and useful manner. What I don’t think he stressed enough is that in my view every single start-up must identify what the applicable revenue stream(s) for their business is (are).

One of my roles (I like to keep it plural) is with the Jenson Seed EIS Fund which made 35 investments in early stage businesses during 2013 and has made 7 so far in 2014. To do that we have seen a lot of business plans during to get to these investments and one of the key failures we have seen is that the entrepreneur involved focuses too heavily on the operations and totally ignores the end customer. Worst still this is most common with pure tech companies who often appear to think that the benefits of their product are so obvious people will find them.

So my advice is look at the most applicable revenue model for your business and make it integral to your vision and business. It can change, and develop, but there are plenty of case studies out there you can learn from. I know you are a disruptive new business and there is nothing else like you out there (raises eyebrow and asks quizzically….”really?”) but if you don’t have revenue you are either a charity, a project or bust.

2. Know your enemy

Most start-ups, whether in tech or old world, fail because they run out of cash. In my experience they run out of cash largely because their revenue predictions fail to materialise as they predicted or at all.

So my advice is get to understand your prospective customers. Spend time with them if possible. LISTEN to what they are telling you and sometimes stop evangelising about your product long enough to take it on board.

Is your product a nice to have? A must have? How does it compare to the completion? Accept there is always an alternative and clearly those alternatives are competitors. Understand the different buying cycles and timings particularly in the B2B environment. Be clear about how difficult it will be to break through in the B2C environment. Being “disruptive” might not be enough.

In short, just as you would in a military campaign, understand your customers as intimately as possible because to know them makes it easier to reach and convert them.

3. Let’s stay together

Once you understand your customer you need to test, test and retest different ways of monetising him. Your original vision might change, as might your revenue model, you might have to pivot (shudder because this word is often misused and I have tried to ban it in our investment panel meetings) but by testing different ways of reaching customers and getting money from them, once you have them make sure you stick with that model.

Too many start-ups assume that their revenue model will work based on no data. As an investor we tend not to support this, and as a business owner I think it is commercial suicide. You need to know how your customer wants to deal with you or how you are going to monetise him most efficiently and then you can stick with that, and them.

4. Do[n’t] stop believing

I was once asked if I loved my products. The question was asked when I co-founded and grew a giftware company (teddy bears, photo frames, key rings etc) to become one of the largest in the sector. My answer was a categorical no. I love my business. I only love my products if customers are buying them and they are making money for my business.

It appears to me that too many entrepreneurs these days love their businesses or products a little too much. Sometimes it is worth taking a step back and considering if what you are doing really has a future or if it needs to change. Whilst persistence beats resistance, blindly banging your head against a brick wall will only lead to a bad headache (often characterised by the phrase “we need to educate the customer”).

5. Bring the noise

If you have identified your revenue model(s), understood your customer and constantly tested and evaluated the data you have received objectively then you should be ready to go. If that is the case, go and go hard. Put all your resource and effort behind supporting this and grab as much scale as you can manage as quickly as you can manage it before somebody else does.

As a final observation, the tech revolution has brought many great and wondrous things and appears set to deliver for a lot longer. One darker side that I have witnessed is a certain complacency in the tech sector, which gave this blog post’s title. However, in my experience in business you might build it, but it rarely makes them come. You have to drag them (metaphorically) kicking and screaming.

For those of you that might have been wondering I decided to use song lyrics for each of the headings. To stop you all going nuts the answers are:

1. Coldplay – The Scientist
2. Green Day – Know Your Enemy
3. Al Green – Let’s stay together
4. Journey – Don’t Stop Believing
5. Public Enemy & Anthrax – Bring the noise

Sorry if they are a little tenuous…but it amused me!

About An Author:
Martin Spiller describes himself on Twitter as an entrepreneur, consultant, lecturer, investor, accountant, barrister (non-practising) and is fuelled mostly by caffeine and nicotine. Martin can be reached on Twitter @MartinRSpiller

About martinspiller

Entrepreneur. Consultant. Lecturer. Investor. Accountant. Barrister (non-practising). Fuelled mostly by caffeine and nicotine. Warning.. sometimes sweary!

One thought on “Just because you build it doesn’t mean they will come!

  1. Pingback: I could tell you, but then I’d have to kill you. | Technology Blog

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