Jack Dorsey must not abandon Twitter Commerce for Display Advertising Model

Jack Dorsey’s recent submission about the Twitter platform ( “Twitter is live: live commentary, live connections, live conversations.” ) has created/reinstated an enthusiasm among various stakeholders for another revival for the company, from 30% below the IPO listing price with over $500m loses, high employee turnaround and, more importantly, low user growth.

Once the closest rival to Facebook, Twitter has reduced to a 10th of Mark Zuckerberg’s empire and there are many hypotheses around, from the famous open blog from to Chris Sacca to Dick Costolo’s claim for shareholder pressure for a quick and high-profit margin, to a disengaged developer community, as to why Twitter is struggling to take off, both monetarily and on the popularity front.

No doubt since Jack Dorsey took over as CEO, company has shown some promising progress such as a redesigned home page for non-registered users, talks about increasing tweet length to 10K, Twitter Moments, support for GIF and videos, re-integrating the developer community to develop apps using Fabric and opening Direct Message for non-followers. However Jack failed to show any progress on the Twitter commerce side, which in my opinion might leave the company with a lot to catch up with on the social commerce or sharing economy side, which is growing at a far higher rate than any other commerce medium.

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Apple Answers a Wake-Up Call From Taylor Swift

24/7 Wall St.

apple-logoThere are a lot of interesting issues surrounding the kerfuffle between pop music star Taylor Swift and Apple Inc. (NASDAQ: AAPL), not the least of which is how quickly the most valuable company on earth can change its tune when confronted by an individual with real star power. As she did when she withheld her latest album, “1989,” from music streaming service Spotify because the company offers a free stream, Swift withheld the album from Apple because it is offering a free, three-month trial of its new Apple Music service.

Swift’s argument is simple: if Apple or anyone else wants to stream my music, they have to pay me for the privilege. Apple did not plan to pay artist royalties for any tune streamed during the three-month trial period.

Calling Apple’s plan “shocking, disappointing, and completely unlike this historically progressive and generous company,” Swift got the answer she wanted. Late…

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